Tag Archives: Coalition Building

Allies in a Dangerous Time

By Amanda Pullum

The enemy of my enemy, as the saying goes, is my friend. While we should probably be skeptical of this attitude toward friendship, it can help us understand why activists sometimes form short-term–or even seemingly paradoxical–alliances during times of threat.

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Informing Activists: How can I build coalitions and increase diversity?

Richard Wood Introduction

How do I increase diversity in my organization?

What should I know about building coalitions?

Recommended Readings

Classic

Staggenborg, S. 1986. Coalition work in the pro-choice movement: Organizational and environmental opportunities and obstacles. Social Problems, 33(5):374-390.

Review

Van Dyke, N., & McCammon, H. J. 2010. Strategic alliances: Coalition building and social movements. U of Minnesota Press.

Contemporary

Maney, G. M., Maney, G. M., Kutz-Flamenbaum, R., Rohlinger, D., & Goodwin, J. 2012. Agreeing for different reasons: Ideology, strategic differences, and coalition dynamics in the Northern Ireland civil rights movement. Strategies for Social Change, 37:170.


We would like to thank the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for their support of the Youth Activism Project through the Youth and Participatory Politics Research Network.

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A Revolt against Chinese Intellectualism: Understanding the Protest Script in Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement of 2014

By Ming-sho Ho

Karl Marx’s famous saying that great historical events happen twice, first as tragedy and later as farce, originated from an observation of the futile attempt of French leftwing revolutionaries of 1848 to ape their predecessors in the revolution of 1789. Marx apparently considered it a paradox that a history-making intention involved borrowing “names, battle slogans, and costumes” from the past. Thus he implied a truly successful revolution would have to proceed without the nostalgic attachment to the previous protest script. Continue reading

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