Category Archives: Informing Activists

What kinds of repression should I anticipate when I am active in a democratic country?

Paul Chang

What kinds of repression should I anticipate when I am active in a democratic country?

Recent work by the author:

Chang, Paul. 2015. Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement, 1970-1979. Stanford University Press

Classic:

Koopmans, Ruud. “Dynamics of repression and mobilization: The German extreme right in the 1990s.” Mobilization: An International Quarterly 2.2 (1997): 149-164.

Review:

Earl, Jennifer. 2011. “Political repression: Iron fists, velvet gloves, and diffuse control.” Annual Review of Sociology 37: 261-284.

Contemporary:

Suh, Chan S., Ion Bogdan Vasi, and Paul Y. Chang. “How social media matter: Repression and the diffusion of the Occupy Wall Street movement.” Social Science Research 65 (2017): 282-293.

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What are different things to think about when you are planning or holding a meeting?

Sam Scovill:

What are different things to think about when you are planning or holding a meeting?

 

Recommended Readings:

Classic:

Rothschild-Whitt, Joyce. 1979. The collectivist organization: An alternative to rational-bureaucratic models. American Sociological Review, 44, 509-527.

Freeman, Jo. 1972. “The tyranny of structurelessness.” Berkeley Journal of Sociology p.151-164.

Review:

Ganz, Marshall, and Elizabeth McKenna. 2018. “Bringing leadership back in.” pp. 185-202. The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Social Movements. 2nd ed, edited by David A. Snow, Sarah A. Soule, Hanspeter Kriesi, Holly J. McCammon. Wiley: Hoboken, NJ

Contemporary:

Heather McKee Hurwitz. 2019. Gender and Race in the Occupy Movement: Relational Leadership and Discriminatory Resistance. Mobilization. 24 (2) pp. 157-176.

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Informing Activists: “How can movements work inside of religious communities to make change?”

Jonathan Coley

“How can movements work inside of religious communities to make change?”

Classic Reading:

Wood, Richard L. 1999. “Religious culture and political action.” Sociological Theory 17.3: 307-332.

Review:

Snow, David A. and Kraig Beyerlein. 2019. Bringing the Study of Religion and Social Movements Together: Toward an Analytically Productive Intersection. in The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Social Movements Edited by David Snow, Sarah Soule, Hanspeter Kriesi, and Holly McCammon: 2nd ed. p. 571-585.

Contemporary:

Coley, Jonathan S. 2018. Gay on God’s Campus: Mobilizing for LGBT Equality at Christian Colleges and Universities. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press.

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Informing Activists: “What are the challenges and opportunities that girls and young women should consider when getting involved in social movements?”

Nancy Whittier:

 

“What are the challenges and opportunities that girls and young women should consider when getting involved in social movements?”

 

Classic:
Taylor, Verta. 1999. “Gender and social movements: Gender processes in women’s self-help movements.” Gender & Society 13(1): 8-33.

Robnett, Belinda. 1996. “African-American women in the civil rights movement, 1954-1965: Gender, leadership, and micromobilization.” American Journal of Sociology. 101(6): 1661-1693.

Review:
McCammon, Holly J., Taylor, Verta, Reger, Jo, & Einwohner, Rachel L. (Eds.). (2017). The Oxford Handbook of US Women’s Social Movement Activism. Oxford University Press.

Contemporary:
Yang, Chia-Ling. 2017. “The political is the personal: women’s participation in Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement.” Social Movement Studies 16(6): 660-671.

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Informing Activists: “Applying social movement concepts to immigration activism”

Lisa Martinez:

“Applying social movement concepts to immigration activism”

Classic:

Martinez, Lisa M. 2005. “Yes we can: Latino Participation in Unconventional Politics.” Social Forces 84(1): 135-155.

Review:

Mora, Maria De Jesus, Rodolfo Rodriguez, Alejandro Zermeño, and Paul Almeida. 2018. “Immigrant Rights and Social Movements.” Sociology Compass 12, no. 8

Contemporary:

Zepeda-Millán, Chris. 2017. Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism. Boston, MA: Cambridge University Press.

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Informing Activists: “What responses should I expect from adults when I get involved in activism?”

Jessica Taft:

“What responses should I expect from adults when I get involved in activism?”

Classic: 

Gordon, Hava R., and Jessica K. Taft. 2011. “Rethinking youth political socialization: Teenage activists talk back.” Youth & Society (43)4: 1499-1527.

Review: 

Earl, Jennifer, Thomas V. Maher, and Thomas Elliott. 2017. “Youth, activism, and social movements.” Sociology Compass (11)4.

Contemporary: 

Terriquez, Veronica. 2015. “Intersectional mobilization, social movement spillover, and queer youth leadership in the immigrant rights movement.” Social Problems 62.3: 343-362.

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Youth, Social Movements & Activism Syllabus

Youth, Social Movements, and Activism Syllabus

This course provides an undergraduate level introduction to the study of youth political socialization and political activism. Young people are the backbone of most social movements from the Civil Rights and anti-Vietnam War movements to more contemporary examples like Black Lives Matter, #Occupy, and the anti-gun violence movement. The first half of the course presents an overview of theories of youth political socialization, political participation, and their role in social movements. The course specifically explores concerns about the state of youth political participation and the realities of participation, theories regarding how youth are socialized to participate in politics (and the impediments to participation), the history of youth in social movements (specifically why youth and college campuses are so important). The second half builds on this structure to review areas where youth are bringing new energy to political participation. The syllabus includes discussion in how youth have updated tactics, continue to redefine what counts as political, and incorporate new (intersectionality) and old (economic inequality) concerns into movements. The course is built around a midterm and final exam, as well as a research paper on a youth-oriented social movement that is broken up into several smaller “proposals” throughout the semester. Students are also assessed on their participation in class discussion over the substantive issues. The course serves as a point of connection between courses on youth and society, political sociology, political communication, and social movements.

 

The syllabus with usage notes and learning outcomes are available on the TRAILS website.

An un-gated link to Youth & Activism syllabus is available here.

Additional material are available here.

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