Teaching Youth & Activism- One Week Modules

We have created three one week modules for courses on Youth & Society, Social Movements, and Political Sociology for instructors who are interested in integrating the material, but not teaching an entire class on youth and activism. The modules include a selection of readings on the topic, and a brief description of how the readings fit together.

Additional material are available here.

A link to a word document version of this post is available here

Youth & Society ~ Youth and Politics

Earl, Jennifer, Thomas V. Maher, and Thomas Elliott. 2017. “Youth, activism, and social movements.” Sociology Compass (11)4

Lee, Nam-Jin, Dhavan V. Shah, and Jack M. McLeod. 2013. “Processes of political socialization: A communication mediation approach to youth civic engagement.” Communication Research 40.5: 669-697.

Dalton, Russell. 2013. “Chapter 4: Who Participates?” p.63-86 in Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Democracies, 6th Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press

Munson, Ziad. 2010. “Mobilizing on campus: Conservative movements and today’s college students.” Sociological Forum. 25 (4): 769-786

This module offers a week overview of interdisciplinary research on youth political engagement ranging from political talk to activism. The Earl, Maher, and Elliott piece offers an overview of the literature focusing on youth participation in social movements, the role of campus for activism, how youth intersects with gender and race, and, finally, some insights into the future of the field. The other three articles offer more direct dives into these areas. Lee, Shah, and McLeod introduce the communication mediation approach to political communication, Dalton offers an overview of what youth participation looks like on a macro level, and Munson offers an excellent case-based analysis of why college campuses are so fertile for activism that focuses on the idea of “transition points.”

 

Social Movements ~ Youth activism on campus

Earl, Jennifer, Thomas V. Maher, and Thomas Elliott. 2017. “Youth, activism, and social movements.” Sociology Compass (11)4

Van Dyke, Nella. 1998. “Hotbeds of activism: Locations of student protest.” Social Problems 45.2: 205-220.

Munson, Ziad. 2010. “Mobilizing on campus: Conservative movements and today’s college students.” Sociological Forum. 25 (4): 769-786

Velasquez, Alcides, and Robert LaRose. 2015. “Youth collective activism through social media: The role of collective efficacy.” New Media & Society 17.6: 899-918.

This module offers a week overview of social movement research that focuses specifically on youth and campus activism. The Earl, Maher, and Elliott piece offers an overview of the literature focusing on youth participation in social movements, the role of campus for activism, how youth intersects with gender and race, and, finally, some insights into the future of the field. Van Dyke’s seminal articles offers a quantitative analysis of which campuses produce activism and why, and—in combination with Munson’s excellent case-based analysis of why college campuses are so fertile for activism will prove insightful for discussing youth activism—as well as connecting with literature on political process theory, resources, and micromobilization more generally. Finally, Velasquez and LaRose offer an insightful approach that hints towards the use of more innovative tactics and frames (i.e. intersectionality) that build on prior campus activism.

 

Political Sociology ~ Youth and Politics

Earl, Jennifer, Thomas V. Maher, and Thomas Elliott. 2017. “Youth, activism, and social movements.” Sociology Compass (11)4

Lee, Nam-Jin, Dhavan V. Shah, and Jack M. McLeod. 2013. “Processes of political socialization: A communication mediation approach to youth civic engagement.” Communication Research 40.5: 669-697.

Dalton, Russell. 2013. “Chapter 4: Who Participates?” p.63-86 in Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Democracies, 6th Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press

Milkman, Ruth. 2017.”A New Political Generation: Millennials and the Post-2008 Wave of Protest.” American Sociological Review 82.1: 1-31.

This module offers a week overview of political sociology research that focuses specifically on youth and political participation. The Earl, Maher, and Elliott piece offers an overview of the literature focusing on youth participation in social movements, the role of campus for activism, how youth intersects with gender and race, and, finally, some insights into the future of the field. Lee, Shah, and McLeod’s article offers a theoretical approach for how youth are socialized to participate politically. Dalton’s piece focuses on trends in political participation—the outcome of socialization—among young people. Finally, Milkman offers a view on young people and the impact they are having on contemporary politics.

Additional Suggested Readings

Overview

Dalton, Russell. 2013. “Chapter 4: Who Participates?” p.63-86 in Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Democracies, 6th Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press

Caren, Neal, Raj Andrew Ghoshal, and Vanesa Ribas. 2011. “A social movement generation: Cohort and period trends in protest attendance and petition signing.” American Sociological Review 76.1: 125-151.

Campus Activism

Van Dyke, Nella. 1998. “Hotbeds of activism: Locations of student protest.” Social Problems 45.2: 205-220.

Munson, Ziad. 2010. “Mobilizing on campus: Conservative movements and today’s college students.” Sociological Forum. 25 (4): 769-786

Political Socialization

Lee, Nam-Jin, Dhavan V. Shah, and Jack M. McLeod. 2013. “Processes of political socialization: A communication mediation approach to youth civic engagement.” Communication Research 40.5: 669-697.

Ojeda, Christopher, and Peter K. Hatemi. 2015. “Accounting for the Child in the Transmission of Party Identification.” American Sociological Review 80.6: 1150-1174

Youth & Social Movement Organizations

McAdam, Doug. 1986. “Recruitment to high-risk activism: The case of freedom summer.” American Journal of Sociology 92.1: 64-90.

Gordon, Hava Rachel. 2007. “Allies within and without: How adolescent activists conceptualize ageism and navigate adult power in youth social movements.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography 36.6: 631-668.

Intersectionality & Youth Activism

Velasquez, Alcides, and Robert LaRose. 2015. “Youth collective activism through social media: The role of collective efficacy.” New Media & Society 17.6: 899-918.

Terriquez, Veronica. 2015. “Intersectional mobilization, social movement spillover, and queer youth leadership in the immigrant rights movement.” Social Problems 62.3: 343-362.

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