September Dialogue: Ground Wars and the 2012 Elections

Our September essay dialogue uses Rasmus Kleis Nielsen’s new book Ground Wars: Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns (Princeton University Press, 2012) as a jumping off point to discuss grassroots campaign strategies as they relate to the upcoming U.S. Presidential and Congressional elections.

Ground Wars investigates how “personalized political communication” is shaping campaigns and electoral outcomes.  Modern canvassing uses technical infrastructure, highly developed databases, and other party resources to launch highly targeted voter campaigns.  We have asked contributors to react to this advanced form of grassroots campaigning, its implications for the future of American politics, and its potential impact on American democracy more broadly.

Our contributors to this dialogue have written fascinating essays, drawing on scholarly work in multiple disciplines and practical experience on the campaign trail.  Four essays are posted now, and we will have a second round mid month.

Marshall Ganz, Harvard University (essay)
Andreas Jungherr, University of Bamberg, Germany (essay)
David Karpf, George Washington University (essay)
Daniel Kreiss, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (essay)

We sincerely thank our contributors for their essays, and we hope you enjoy the discussion.  As always, please join the discussion by posting your thoughts, reactions, or opinions in the comments.

Editors in Chief,
Grace Yukich, David Ortiz, Rory McVeigh, Dan Myers

2 Comments

Filed under Essay Dialogues, Ground Wars and the 2012 Elections

2 responses to “September Dialogue: Ground Wars and the 2012 Elections

  1. Pingback: GOTV in International Campaigns? | Too Bad You Never Knew Ace Hanna

  2. Pingback: Collecting My Recent Posts from Around the Web « shouting loudly

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